• Assessment of a change to shift pattern

    2003 - Chemical

    The client was planning to change from a 8-hour to 12-hour shift pattern. The main driver for this was that they were having problems arranging cover for holidays, sickness etc. This had resulted in frequent working of double shifts (i.e. 16 hours). Andy made extensive use of fatigue research documented in HSE Contract Research Report 254/1999, and the working time directive and UK regulations. Communication was key element in this project and research about shift handover described in HSE offshore report OTO 96003 was used.

    The client was planning to change from a 8-hour to 12-hour shift pattern. The main driver for this was that they were having problems arranging cover for holidays, sickness etc. This had resulted in frequent working of double shifts (i.e. 16 hours). Andy made extensive use of fatigue research documented in HSE Contract Research Report 254/1999, and the working time directive and UK regulations. Communication was key element in this project and research about shift handover described in HSE offshore report OTO 96003 was used.
  • Managing risks of changing shift patterns

    2003 - Chemical

    Following requests from staff, the company were considering a change from 8 hour to 12 hours shift patterns. Andy evaluated the proposed patterns using the HSE's fatigue index and other guidance, including the work time regulations. From this he identified some of the options being considered could result in people working four or more night shifts in a row, and that this may create unnecessary health and safety concerns. As well as fatigue issues, some significant knock-on benefits were expected through improved communication between shifts (less handovers) and with maintenance teams (more likely that jobs would start and finish during the same operations shift). Using HSE research regarding shift handover (HSE offshore report OTO 96003), safety of driving at work (HSE Research Report 020) and his own experiences, Andy presented the potential full impacts of planned changes. Andy discussed the planned changes with the staff likely to be affected. This highlighted some differences of opinion, but a general willingness to give it a go. From the information collected, Andy was able to advise regarding the potential problems with changing the shift and how these could be avoided. Andy has subsequently returned to the site and found that the new shift pattern has been a great success, with staff noticing "radical improvements" in their health, wellbeing and happiness.

    The client was planning to change from a 8-hour to 12-hour shift pattern. The main driver for this was that they were having problems arranging cover for holidays, sickness etc. This had resulted in frequent working of double shifts (i.e. 16 hours). Andy made extensive use of fatigue research documented in HSE Contract Research Report 254/1999, and the working time directive and UK regulations. Communication was key element in this project and research about shift handover described in HSE offshore report OTO 96003 was used.
  • Shift pattern assessment

    2004 - Chemical Manufacture

    The client was planning to change from an 8 hour to 12 hour shift pattern. Also, the number of shift teams was being reduced from six to five, which resulted in employee reductions, and required changes to the way absence (e.g. sickness and holidays) was covered. This project was an evaluation of the proposed changes, including collecting views and comments from the operators being affected. Andy evaluated the planned changes to confirm the new arrangements would be acceptable from a health and safety point of view, and to provide advice about how the changes should be managed. The HSE Fatigue Index was used to evaluate the proposed new pattern. During the project, control room operators raised concerns about mental fatigue from the increased time they would be in the control room on each shift. Some other operators had physically demanding tasks and were concerned that the longer shifts would impact on their work and result in injury and physical fatigue. There was also a general concern about an ageing workforce, and how this affected shift work. The report included a qualitative assessment of the risks and advice about how they could be controlled. Advice was provided regarding human physical capabilities, nutritional requirements and how to avoid physiological fatigue.

  • Working with shift teams to develop a training course for improving the quality of shift handover

    2014 - Gas

    Due to an influx of new personnel to the operating team, concerns had been raised that not everyone understood the importance of shift handover to managing process safety risks.  Andy worked with representatives of the shift teams to develop a half day training course to highlight the problems that can occur if shift handover is not carried out correctly and to provide guidance for improvement.  As a result the company developed a plan to roll out the training to all shift teams.